Facebook’s Latest News Feed Update – Time to Move On?

Facebook_icon

Earlier this week, Facebook updated their News Feed algorithm again, in what many are seeing as the next move towards ‘Facebook Zero’ – i.e. 0% organic reach for pages. Facebook announced three updates – the first is around users who don’t have a lot of content to see. Previously, the algorithm ensured people were not shown multiple posts from the same source in a row, they’re relaxing this measure for people who run out of content to view and are seeking to view more. Nothing major there, the impacts should be minimal.

The second update has a bit more to it – as noted in Facebook’s announcement, this update:

…tries to ensure that content posted directly by the friends you care about, such as photos, videos, status updates or links, will be higher up in News Feed so you are less likely to miss it. If you like to read news or interact with posts from pages you care about, you will still see that content in News Feed. This update tries to make the balance of content the right one for each individual person.”

So the focus of this one is on those friends who you regularly interact with, on showing you more content from those users and ensuring those posts appear more prominently in your feeds. This is based on your interaction history – Facebook will use past behaviour as a guide to add weight to the prominence of friends’ posts and ensure they appear higher in your results. This will impact page posts because it will be adding increased preference metrics to content posted from certain profiles – most probably, the impact of this will be minimal, but if a person is more likely to be shown content from friends, they’re conversely less likely to see posts from pages in their daily News Feed allocation.

The third update relates to posts that friends have liked or commented on:

…many people have told us they don’t enjoy seeing stories about their friends liking or commenting on a post. This update will make these stories appear lower down in News Feed or not at all, so you are more likely to see the stuff you care about directly from friends and the pages you have liked.”

svm_bff_edgestory

Again, the precise impact of this change is hard to predict, but it underlines the fact that ‘likes’, in themselves, are becoming little more than an aesthetic measure – and worse, that even interactions like comments are not necessarily going to increase your post reach. This change inadvertently puts more emphasis on shares and on prompting users to take direct action to explicitly promote their support of your page.

So what’s that mean for Facebook marketing? This change further underlines the need for brands to move from a broadcast focus to making themselves part of the conversation. With this update, Facebook is essentially saying that their users want to use the platform to interact with friends and the content they’re individually interested in, and the only way to effectively promote your pages without moving to paid ads is to generate conversation amongst people independent of your properties. That’s obviously easier said than done, but the principle for Facebook marketing remains that you need to create great content, you need to listen to what your audience wants and is responding to, and you need to become part of those conversations in order to attract more direct interactions with individuals and ensure your brand is part of any relevant conversations.

This also underlines the need to work with individual advocates – I’ve already seen it suggested by some that maybe brands should create personal profiles to help get better reach amongst their communities, but that won’t work, as it’s in violation of Facebook’s terms. Having people speak on your brand’s behalf is the best way to ensure you’re maximising Facebook reach – this is why employee advocacy is becoming a big focus, because who better to speak on behalf of your brand than those who live it everyday? Happy, engaged, socially-empowered employees can play a big part in brand awareness, and this update only reinforces the need to consider ways to facilitate authentic conversations across Facebook’s social graph.

This also sets the stage for updates to Facebook’s own search capabilities – Facebook recently announced changes to their API, effective April 30, which will reduce the capabilities for third party apps, particularly in relation to personal profiles, groups and search functionality. These changes seem relatively small, but for Facebook to be restricting them, my guess is that they’re close to releasing improved search functionality within their own walls, hence, these changes are designed to keep people on Facebook, as opposed to managing their Facebook presence via other platforms. This News Feed update somewhat supports this, in that it puts more emphasis on search to find content, as opposed to tangential organic reach.

Whatever the outcome, it’s clear that this update doesn’t help Facebook marketers and further supports the looming dawn of Facebook Zero. So should you just move on and forget about Facebook marketing? Depends on your audience, depends on how this changes your engagement levels – depends on many individual factors that can’t be answered in a generic sense. The fact is that Facebook has 1.44 billion active users, and many of them are likely interested in your products and services. Reaching them might not be as easy as it once was, but it is still totally possible, and totally viable when done in a considered way.

BuzzSumo Adds ‘Trending Content’ Feature

buzzsumo

Back in early 2014, I came across a content discovery tool called BuzzSumo. Steve Rayson, who regularly writes for Social Media Today, had referenced BuzzSumo data in one of his posts, so I clicked through, checked it out – and honestly, I was awed by the many varied applications I could immediately use this data for.

In basic form, BuzzSumo shows you the social share stats for any URL, website or topic. In itself, this is pretty helpful, but one of the more impressive elements of BuzzSumo is the developers’ awareness of how this data will be used, and what data will be useful. As such, over time they’ve added a range of additional features: you can filter the results by language or region; you can narrow the listing down to content type – infographics, videos, interviews; they added the ability to search for influencers on any given topic, reports to compare domains or examine backlinks, by URL or domain. As more new functions have been added, I’ve found myself using and recommending the app ever more frequently.

If you’ve not taken the time to check out BuzzSumo, you should, it really is a great app. And now they’ve got another addition – Steve recently got in touch to give me a look at their latest feature.

On Trend

BuzzSumo’s latest trick is monitoring trending content. The new feature enables you to set up a dashboard of trending or most shared content based on whatever keywords and topics you’d like to keep tabs on.

BuzzSumo2

In this example, the dashboard is set to show the most shared content under the topic of ‘social media’ over the last 24 hours. You can see the keywords I’ve used to track this in the listing just above the posts:

BuzzSumo1

The dashboard is tracking the terms ‘social media’, ‘LinkedIn’, ‘Facebook’, etc. Any topic that mentions those terms is included in this dashboard, which is sorted by most shared to least. There’s a range of additional filters you can apply to the results – you can include results from the last 24 hours, or the last 2 hours, and anything in between. You can also narrow the listing down by country and by either ‘Most Shared’ or ‘Trending Now’.

BuzzSumo3

If you choose ‘Trending Now’, the results will be listed based on each item’s trending score, which measures the velocity of shares within a specified time period. This is a great way to stay on top of the content attracting the most interest in specific niches or based on your target keywords – you can also include hashtags in your search terms to capture all relevant discussion.

What’s more, you can share your dashboards with anyone – logged out users can view the content, so you could make a dashboard capturing all mentions of, say, an event and the BuzzSumo trending log will form a comprehensive overview of the most discussed and trending content related to it – this one, for example, is looking at the UK General Election campaign:

BuzzSumo5

New Possibilities

Now, if you’re mind’s not already floating off with the various possibilities of this new function, here are a few ways in which the feature could be useful:

  • Content curation – The most obvious benefit of this new functionality is for content curation. Being able to identify the most popular and trending content, based on your specified keywords – in your specific region – is great insight into what’s resonating, and what’s likely to be of relevance to your audience. Not only does this enable you to stay on top of developing discussion points and issues in your niche, it can also act as a guide when considering what to share with your community to keep them up to date
  • Content creation – So, if you have a trending dashboard set up and you can see that a certain issue is running hot, and you have your own perspective to add to the discussion, that’s probably a good cue for you to get writing. Adding your personal insight to a trending issue can go a long way towards reinforcing your position as a leader in your field – having the list of trending topics, right there in front of you, could save you a heap of time in searching and locating relevant content by other methods
  • Insight – Not only are you getting valuable insight into what content is trending, BuzzSumo’s listings also show you where that content is reaching an audience. You can see below the preview images for each post that there’s also a listing of how many shares each story has generated on the five major social platforms. This effectively highlights the platforms you need to be active on in order to reach the audience discussing those topics – locating and tapping into those conversations could prove extremely valuable, as, targeted with your specific keywords, it’s leading you directly to your where your target audience is at. There’s obviously a bit more to it than just logging on and jumping into a trending conversation, but it’s a guide, an indicator of where to look. And maybe it’ll show you opportunities you’d not have previously considered

These are the three main uses for the trending dashboard from a straight marketing and research perspective. But as noted in the event example above, there are a heap more ways you could consider using this. There’s also an RSS feature that you can use to stay informed with the most up-to-date info on trending topics in your industry – and the terms you use to create the board are defined by you, so you can make it as specific or broad-matched as you like.

New Depths

As noted previously, I’ve been pretty impressed by BuzzSumo’s progression – their features always add a new level of depth, and they’ve really thought through the functionality and user-friendliness of the process when putting together these features. Trending topics again adds another level, and there’s a wide range of possible applications and uses for this option. No doubt you’re already considering using it for your own purposes, beyond what I’ve noted here. If you aren’t using BuzzSumo, you definitely check it out, and if you are, you’ll no doubt love the new feature – another solid addition from the BuzzSumo team.

The Apple Watch is Going to Be a Huge Failure. Maybe.

apple watch

The Apple Watch is coming, and many are already decrying it’s demise. Think it’s gonna’ be a loser? The tech giant’s definitely had it’s fair share of doubters over time:

“Mark my words, these new ipods I think they’re calling them are just the latest fad, and will soon flounder and disappear along with other bad ideas like DCC, Eight-tracks and Betamax videotapes.” – “iPod: 7 Reasons Why Apple’s Walkman Knock-Off Is Doomed To Fail”, What Culture

“I question the company’s ability to sell into a tight consumer market right now at the iPod’s current price” – “Apple’s iPod Spurs Mixed Reactions”, CNET, October 23, 2001

“Great just what the world needs, another freaking MP3 player. Go Steve! Where’s the Newton?!” – “Apple’s New Thing (iPod)”, MacRumours, July, 2001

“Prediction No. 1: The iPhone will be a major disappointment. The hype has been enormous. Apple says its iPhone is “literally five years ahead of any other mobile phone.” A stock-market analyst says, “The iPhone has the potential to be even bigger than the iPod.” I think not. An iPod is a divergence device; an iPhone is a convergence device. There’s a big difference between the two. In the high-tech world, divergence devices have been spectacular successes. But convergence devices, for the most part, have been spectacular failures.” – “Why the iPhone Will Fail”, AdAge, June 18, 2007

“The Apple phone will be exclusive to one of the major networks in each territory and some customers will switch networks just to get it, but not as many as had been hoped. As customers start to realise that the competition offers better functionality at a lower price, by negotiating a better subsidy, sales will stagnate. After a year a new version will be launched, but it will lack the innovation of the first and quickly vanish. The only question remaining is if, when the iPod phone fails, it will take the iPod with it.” – “Why the Apple Phone will Fail, and Fail badly”, The Register, December 23rd, 2006

“[The iPhone’s] virtual keyboard will be about as useful for tapping out emails and text messages as a rotary phone. Don’t be surprised if a sizable contingent of iPhone buyers express some remorse at ditching their BlackBerry when they spend an extra hour each day pumping out emails on the road.” – “The Futurist: We Predict the iPhone Will Bomb” – TechCrunch, June 7, 2007

“The iPhone is nothing more than a luxury bauble that will appeal to a few gadget freaks” – “Apple iPhone Will Fail in a Late, Defensive Move”, Bloomberg, January 14, 2007

“There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It’s a $500 subsidized item. They may make a lot of money. But if you actually take a look at the 1.3 billion phones that get sold, I’d prefer to have our software in 60% or 70% or 80% of them, than I would to have 2% or 3%, which is what Apple might get.” Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, “CEO Forum: Microsoft’s Ballmer having a ‘great time‘”, USA Today, April 30, 2007

“What Apple risks here is its reputation as a hot company that can do no wrong. If it’s smart it will call the iPhone a ‘reference design’ and pass it to some suckers to build with someone else’s marketing budget. Then it can wash its hands of any marketplace failures… Otherwise I’d advise people to cover their eyes.” – “Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone”, MarketWatch, March 28, 2007

“Yes, [the iPad is] a sharp piece of technology, and given Apple’s track record, it’s going to be fun to use. But other than satisfying a lust for new gadgets and shiny things, can you think of a real need for a device like this?” – “10 reasons the iPad could fail catastrophically”, Games Radar, January 29, 2010

“Tablet PCs suck. They’re underpowered, only marginally portable, and awkward to use in anything but a traditional seated position, with a desk to support them.” – “Why Apple’s rumored iTablet will fail big time”, InfoWorld, December 22, 2009

“In the end, I think that the iPad will eventually be regarded much like Apple TV – a product that Jobs should have left on the drawing boards.” – “Why the iPad will fail to win significant market share”, TechRepublic, February 23, 2010

appleproducts3

Still confident the Apple Watch is destined for the scrap heap?

Brand Journalism Versus Brand Storytelling – Is There a Difference?

editing

I read an interview with author Arnold Zable recently in which he discussed his work in championing causes through his writing, notably asylum seekers. Zable talked about the power of storytelling in such efforts, saying that ‘story is a very beautiful way to lead people somewhere else’. Zable noted that more than statistics and facts, telling the real story, revealing the true, human experience behind issues is the only real way to cut through and make people take notice.

Zable’s words definitely rang true to me – we’re constantly berated by numbers and figures behind issues like asylum seekers or climate change, to the point where their effectiveness is diminished. But a real story, of how a mother fled a war-torn land to save her children, that brings the issue home in a far more visceral and powerful way. You feel it, you respond to it. While data and figures are important, logical cues, the power of storytelling should not – and cannot – be underestimated.

The Rise of the Brand Journalist

This got me to thinking about how we’re discussing storytelling in content marketing. There’s a big focus on story at the moment, because emotional triggers are what drive social sharing. The ever increasing amount of people using social media leads to an equally increasing amount of brands looking to utilise social channels to reach their audience, and the best way to do that, to compel people to like and share your brand message, is through content. Storytelling has always been the strongest way to deliver a resonant message, but now, with the audience having more control than ever over their media inputs, compelling content is crucial. Shareable content. You need to give people a reason to like your brand, a reason to want to talk about your business or business message. People aren’t on social to be advertised to, they want to be part of something bigger than themselves, they want to join in on the wider conversation. The more your content can form a part of that discussion, the more successful your brand will be at maximising social channels.

One thing I have noted, in seeing the growing emphasis on content and storytelling in marketing, is that the term ‘brand journalism’ has also grown in step. The pervading view is that all brands are now publishers in the modern digital landscape – the audience needs a reason to align with you, so you need to tell stories, and online platforms provide you with the means to do just that. This has seen an increasing number of businesses look to producing their own stories, their own angles on relevant discussions, and that, effectively, is brand journalism. But every time I see this term I question whether a brand journalist is what you really want.

The Power of Story

Definitely, journalists are accomplished writers who are able to communicate the facts of the story, and many of them are, at heart, storytellers who are passionate about finding the core of a piece and building an experience for the reader. But a lot of journalism, too, is facts and figures.

For instance, this was a piece in an Australian newspaper recently, looking at the tragic disappearance of Dane Kowalski:

DK

This is solid news journalism, all the facts are there, all the detail. But compare that to this single post from a friend of Dane’s, who’d been doing all he could to locate him:

DK2

In two sentences, this post has captured far more emotion, delivered far more resonance, because this is something this person is living. The pain is raw, real – the story is more than a piece in the news section. Every story is – there’s more to a news item than the who, what, when and where – the why is the real story. The people living it are the real connectors. You can read over a set of facts like:

DK3

Yet none of those figures are as compelling as an actual story:

DK4

Nothing comes from no where. In every story, in everyone’s life, in every event, there’s a passion, a human heart at it’s core. That story is what people relate to, what people identify with, and ultimately, what people respond to. Given that, in many cases it may not be ‘brand journalists’ that you need, but ‘brand storytellers’, people who can uncover the true purpose and passion behind what you do.

A Human Story

Of course, many, if not most, journalists are driven by a passion to tell human stories, to share that core truth of a story in order to let the audience develop an informed opinion on the subject. But it always stands out to me when I see the term used. And a lot of the content that does get shared via social networks is facts and figures based, so it’s not to say that a news-style approach doesn’t work either, but I guess the point here is in understanding what gets shared, why people share content – it’s in understanding what stories resonate with audiences. Those are the real stories, the human side. A news story might be about a man’s company going bust, but that didn’t just happen. There’s a long trail of events that lead to that business collapsing, a story behind those details that would allow the reader to build a better understanding and emotional connection with the material – and this type of investigative journalism, based in true storytelling, is what’s most beneficial to building better discussion and understanding. Because people make judgements based on what they read. If they only have the basic details, their opinions will be established on those. But if they have all the information, then they can absorb it and make a judgement based on the whole picture.

The TV show Catfish is a great example – someone will be scamming someone else online by pretending to be someone they’re not – and it’s easy for us, as the viewers, to side with the victim, because they are the ones being lied to. But more often than not, the perpetrators themselves are just sad, or lonely, or lost and when you hear their side of the story, the right and wrong of the situation isn’t so clear. They’re all people, they all do things for their own reasons. Those reasons are powerful and add real insight. Those are the stories we need to share.

Not everyone wants to read the detail, not everyone will appreciate the story, but it’s important to understand what resonates, what style of storytelling works to reach people’s emotional triggers and subsequently generates discussion and community. Facts and figures and important, but why are they important? What do those numbers actually mean for the real people involved?  Great storytelling reveals this, great journalism reveals this, but you need to recognise what you’re actually aiming for when establishing a content plan and working with writers and writing staff.

Do You Have to Produce Video Content to Succeed in Social Media?

Facebook video

 

 

 

 

So, if a social media expert, or someone going under a similar moniker, comes to you and tells you that absolutely have to create video content, it might be time to look for a new advisor. Video is powerful, no doubt, and it’s a great way to generate engagement and build your brand online – the expanded capacity of our mobile networks and the evolution of apps and social platforms has enabled a new age of video communication. But if you’re only producing video content in order to make videos, to ‘do video content’, it’s quite possible that you’re missing the point, and will struggle as a result.

A Question of Quality

The thing is, bad content is bad content. It won’t matter if it’s video, audio, performance art – if no one likes it, it won’t get shared. Actually that’s not true, maybe people not liking it is what you’re going for, and that leads to people sharing – if it’s not sparking an emotional response of some kind, it’s going nowhere. And this is the biggest risk in the new wave of video content – while everyone should consider and be encouraged to think about how they can utilise video, if you don’t have an original or interesting idea, it may not be worth doing. The increased emphasis on video is seeing people make video content for the sake of making it – I’ve seen people post video of themselves holding their new products as they wave a description card along the bottom of the screen. I’ve seen content like this, from Mike, who, evidently, buys golf clubs:

Okay, bad example, that’s actually been shared a heap of times, but you get my point – making video for the sake of making video is probably not the best way to go. I mean, it won’t cost you a heap – the array of video recording and production apps these days enable anyone to make good quality video at low cost – but the problem is, if the quality of video content, overall, starts to drop, and people’s news feeds get flooded with average quality posts, users will rightfully complain. And complaints lead to algorithm shifts.

“And Like That… He’s Gone”

Facebook, above all else, values user experience. This has been debated over time, whether they care about users or money, but Zuckerberg’s line has always been that user experience is their number one priority. And it’s hard to argue it isn’t, almost every major Facebook algorithm shift has been triggered by user feedback; users said they didn’t like clickbait, so Facebook altered their filter; users didn’t like overly promotional posts, so they were de-emphasised by the algorithm. Facebook knows that, above all else, their power is in audience engagement on the platform. And they also know that people can and will migrate to other platforms, the social landscape can change very quickly. They know this, of course, because that’s how Facebook supplanted MySpace. In social media, if you lose the crowd, you lose, a fact that all the major platforms are acutely aware of, and as a result, they tread more carefully than ever when rolling out updates and features.

So what happens when people start seeing an increase in content they don’t like? They complain, and Facebook is forced to re-evaluate how that type of content is distributed. Right now, native video content is getting the highest organic reach of any post type, but that could change, and that change could literally happen overnight. Currently, Facebook’s distribution algorithm is pretty good at filtering out low quality content – organic reach is, of course, at the lowest it’s ever been, so it’s pretty hard to reach a significant audience either way, and their ad filtering works on a quality scoring-type system to reduce the reach of ads that no one’s responding to. Low quality content, in whatever form that may be, degrades user experience and forces Facebook to re-evaluate how they distribute content to satisfy the needs and expectations of users. Making bad video content is bad overall, as you’re not only potentially hurting your own reach (in terms of post performance influencing future content), but you may also be contributing to a wider resistance to video posts, overall.

There Can Be More Than One…

The argument here is not video or Facebook-specific. – there’s an inherent risk to over-emphasising any one type of content. If you force people to create video – or blog, or post infographics – making people focus on any one type of content will inevitably lead to some people struggling to produce quality work. I love blogging, I write all the time, but I know plenty of people who struggle with it and I’ve seen them post average quality work which, understandably, is getting little engagement, and this is frustrating for them because they’ve been told they absolutely, definitely have to blog. But maybe they’d be better off focussing on something they can do confidently – it’s possible that they could have massive success producing live streams for Periscope. Maybe they’re no good at writing, but really good at conversation – Hangouts on Air or Twitter chats might be a better focus. Definitely, written content is a key element, particularly for SEO purposes – and outside production assistance is always an option (cost prohibitive) – but you might also be able to also utilise transcripts, Storify logs – there are different ways to ensure you’re ticking all the content boxes.

To say anyone needs to create content of any specific type is potentially risky, and with so many options now available to connect, it may be keeping them from their best option to generate interest and engagement.

What’s Good for Them is Good for You

So what content should you focus on? The best way to make content your audience will love is to listen to them. Analyse what your communities are talking about, look at the key interests and topics being discussed amongst those most likely to buy from you or your business. You can use apps like Social Crawlytics to establish where and what content is driving the most social referrals to your site, or BuzzSumo to search for what content is being most shared amongst those in your industry. If you don’t have enough content to go on, run your competitors’ websites through those apps and see what’s driving the most engagement for them – if they’re seeing a heap of engagement with image posts or quizzes, maybe that’s what you should do too.

If you can identify trends or commonalities amongst your audience, you can let those fuel your ideas for content – this will enable you to work with what your audience is after, what they’re most likely to respond to. And of course, this is not to say you should be afraid to try or resistant to testing out what can be done with any type of content – video is generating great response and there’s a wide range of tools available to experiment with. But you shouldn’t be making video for the sake of making video. There’s no point to that and you’re likely not helping your brand any by posting video content that lacks passion, purpose or any spark of creativity. Content is crucial, but what type of content you create should be driven by what your audience is responding to and what’s within your capacity to provide.

But then again, it’s always possible that your worst idea might end up getting the most attention. Now, I’ve gotta go find some old golf clubs.

How Local News Content is Losing Out in the Battle for Attention Online

newspaper

I wrote a piece recently questioning whether the rise of social media has been a positive or negative for our overall levels of political engagement. The idea for that post came from the general level of ambivalence to a recent election in my home state, and how that same sense of lessened political impact seemed to be pervading through social networks and online conversations. The question, really, was about whether giving the audience more specific control over their news inputs would mean we they would actively tune-out content that was of little interest, and whether political news would suffer as a result.

My findings in that investigation were that social media is not necessarily lessening political engagement, but that political parties do need to consider where and how the audience is interacting in order to keep them engaged and maximise the potential of their messaging. In large part, it seems many political organisations have not advanced their communications and outreach strategies in-line with the social media communications shift, and as such, they’re not reaching their audiences as effectively – a concern that will exacerbate as the next generation of digital natives move into more politically and socially aware phases of their lives. Failing to reach them on the platforms where they are most active will lead to political failure – the numbers do indicate that political campaigns that had received traction in social media were significantly more impactful and ensured wider awareness of local political issues.

In order to extend this further, I decided to investigate political and news engagement based on Google search trends – the news stories people are seeking to learn more about via online search. While not definitive, Google search patterns can provide a indicative measure of the public ‘pulse’, the issues of most relevance to any given region. By looking at what we’re searching for, I hoped to get an idea of what issues were gaining the traction amongst Australian internet users and build an understanding of what that means for how we communicate and engage with digitally savvy audiences. What I found was both obvious and enlightening, in equal measure.

What People Want to Know

Google searches

To start with, I wanted to get an idea of internet news trends, of the stories have gained the most traction over time. My suspicion was that by looking through the most popular Google searches, year-on-year, I’d find that we are, indeed, far less politically engaged or news driven overall, as I suspected the charts would be increasingly filled with searches for Justin Bieber and One Direction as time went on. That wasn’t the case – the above chart looks at the most popular Google queries globally. I shaded each topic in a colour – blue for tech, pink for entertainment, orange for news and current affairs and green for sport. As you can see, if anything, people are searching for news content more than ever in the last few years, which suggests the interest in news and current affairs is still strong, or at least on par with gossip and entertainment.

What I also found interesting was that tech queries on Google went way up in the mid-to-late 2000’s, dominating search in 2006-07, but have died down since. Now, given the growth of social media since then, I don’t think this suggests people have become any less engaged in tech – I think it’s more likely that this exemplifies a change in search behaviour. These days, you’re much less likely to go to Google to search for ‘Facebook’ because everyone knows where to find it. Everyone accesses it through apps or links – social media and apps are definitely more prevalent now than they were in 2007, but the way we come to them has changed. That behavioural shift is indicative of the larger trend of how search is being used – it’s hard to say people are searching for news content more frequently in 2014, despite these numbers, because the way people come across news content online has totally changed.

In any event, looking at global trends only forms part of the overall picture – news stories that are relevant to people in Australia might be totally irrelevant on a global scale. Breaking down the search to a regional level would provide more indicative insight into how politically engaged Australians are.

In Australia…

google searches2

First, I looked up the trending Google searches for Australia over the last four years. What was most interesting about this is how few local news stories made the cut – the mentions of ‘RFS’ and ‘AEC’ in 2013 are related to bushfires and elections, and the mention of ‘MyGov’ in 2014 is news related, but the rest is dominated by entertainment. This suggests that maybe we’re not seeking more information on important local issues, but then maybe, I thought, generic search is probably not the most indicative measure of news engagement. I switched the analysis to searches conducted in Google News instead – the news stories Australians have been seeking more information on in that same time period.

Google searches3

Again, not much local content in that list – I highlighted the local stories specifically to better exemplify the data. As you can see, we searched for ‘Julia Gillard’ and ‘Qantas’ in 2011, ‘Mysogynist’ is related to Gillard also in 2012, and we have the ‘Melbourne earthquake’, but outside of that it’s all world news. The most searched for news content by Australians is rarely even about Australia – which is concerning, considering the impact local news issues have on our day-to-day lives. The question is, are we paying more attention to global news to the detriment of local issues?

The Currency of Clicks

Here’s the thing: there’s been much angst in recent times about the negative affect online media is having on journalism, and the quality of journalism in general. Just recently, Edelman published a study on modern media consumption and part of their findings were that 75% of journalists now feel more pressure to think about their story’s potential to get shared on social platforms. Whether you like it or not, the media economy is now driven by the currency of clicks – the website that gets more traffic, makes more money, and those signals, the stories that are generating clicks, are now being used to decide what stories get covered and what gets more attention. You see this every night in the evening news, there’s far more entertainment and gossip type stories making it into the news feed because that’s the content that’s generating clicks online. News outlets want to provide the audiences with what they want, therefore more of this content, of arguably lesser news-relevance, is being reported.

In considering this, and looking at the Google search data, what I think we’re seeing is the effect of a more connected global community. Social networks have provided us with unprecedented access to the global conversation – just last week, I tuned in and watched a building fire in Brooklyn being streamed live via Periscope. The connection is immediate, we’re more connected to the wider world than ever before, but as a result, our attention may be being dominated by global stories, while local issues fade into the background. To clarify this further, I sought to match up Australia’s news search habits with those of other nations to see whether we, as a smaller news nation, are seeing less local content than others.

A Question of Relevance

google searches4

Using Google Trends, I looked up the most searched terms in Google News – Australia for the past 6 years. As you can see, the local issues (pink) were still not largely prevalent, with world news dominating in 2014.

I then compared that to the US:

google searches5

Local news searches in pink.

Now, it makes sense, to a degree, that there would be more local news stories searched in the US, as many of these stories are of international relevance. But have a look at the political discussion in America. Politics features prominently, a lot more prominently than it does in the Australian topics.

google searches6

In the UK, political issues also feature, though their news searches are dominated by sport, particularly in the latter years. But even when it is sport, that’s still local discussion, something largely absent from Australia’s news searches. For comparison, I charted the mentions of local news from each region:

google searches7

Comparatively, the volume of local news searches in Australia is well down on the US and UK, especially when you add-in local sport as an extension of local news content. What this suggests is that we are, in fact, becoming more global in our approach to news – which is undoubtedly a good thing, greater global awareness leads to increased understanding overall. But our newfound connectedness with the global conversation may mean we’re becoming less engaged with the not-so-shiny, less attractive, more boring local news content. But those local issues need our attention and interest.

Relevance vs Popularity

So let’s say this is indicative, that we’re losing the local audience on the news and current affairs issues of significant relevance to them and their day-to-day lives. What then? What can we do to address the regional news attention deficit? The stories that people are clicking on and searching for are the ones they’re interested in, that engage them, so how can we make local politics or societal concerns more popular? This is a question that all political groups need to be considering – in no way should issues be made more divisive or sexy through artificial means, but there is a legitimate concern that local issues are going to receive less and less attention over time, and that’s incredibly bad news for the advancement and improvement of our immediate surroundings. Political groups need to be working to integrate social media and social media communications into their overall mix, into reaching their audiences where they increasingly are. Many are doing this, there’s a whole range of politicians who are actively engaged on social platforms, but there’s a definitive need for politicians to be using social media to connect with their audiences and increase awareness of issues. If the public loses interest in politics, we lose in general – we need our elected officials and leaders to be representing the views and interests of the wider community, and to be relating their messages back to the people in the methods and means they are most engaging with.

While only one part of the puzzle, the Google trends shown here indicate local news engagement is slipping. There’s no definitive answer as to how to combat this, but it’s a question all communicators should be considering – if global news items are dominating attention, how do we tell stories that raise attention and awareness among our audiences? How do we ensure important local issues remain at the height of public interest?

Why Social Media, and Social Media Data, is Good for Business

fbwall

I was doing a talk recently on the correlations between Facebook likes and personality traits when someone put their hand up and said: ‘so what?’ What does this mean – what does it matter to the average business that Facebook likes can indicate a person’s personality? It got me thinking about how to better communicate the relevance of social media and social media data and how it relates, not only to academic studies, but why it’s important, and indeed, good for all businesses to be involved and to understand the possibilities of quantifiable interactions.

The Facebook Study

Earlier this year, researchers from the University of Cambridge and Stanford University released a study which suggested that a person’s Facebook ‘Like’ profile could be more indicative of an individual’s personality traits and leanings than their friends, family members, even their partners. The study was conducted by getting 86,220 participants to complete a 100-item personality questionnaire, based on the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) five-factor model, which measures each person’s responses and maps them to build a personality profile, based on the ‘big five’ personality traits.

Why Social Media is Good for Business1

Within each of these categories are sub-sets, more specific data points based on these over-arching personality points. Based on those responses, each participant’s personality profile was created, then matched against their Facebook ‘Like’s.

Why Social Media is Good for Business2

Now, on a small scale, this doesn’t mean a heap – a person who scored high for anxiety also likes Star Wars – so what? But on a wider scale – when matching this data over, say, 86,000 responses – correlations between interests solidify. Change the equation to 95% of people who scored .80 or above for anxiety also liked Star Wars and you’re starting to see that map. The researchers found that when the individual had 150 Facebook likes to go on, their model could predict their personality traits better than their family members. With 300 likes, it beat out their partners. And when you consider that the average Facebook user has liked more 220 things, you can see how this system could be used as an accurate predictor for a person’s traits and behaviours.

So what does that matter?

So what? What’s the big deal, right? It’s one thing for academics at some big name institution to some up with a complex methodology for indexing personality traits – and good for them – but what does this actually mean for you or I, for the everyday business owner? This is an interesting question, because you can’t just extract these sorts of insights in any easy way. It takes teams of data scientists to build such a model – months, years of learning to implement at such scale. What this research does highlight is the possibilities and potential of big data and social media. What it shows is that business owners should not be resisting social or avoiding it – they should be actively embracing and encouraging its use. Even if that business wasn’t overly interested or inclined to get involved themselves, the potential value of such insights for their own audiences are so great, so massive, that they should see these interactions as access to a whole new way of thinking.

How so? Consider this:

Ninety per cent of the world’s data has been generated over the last two years. Ninety per cent. That means everything that exists now, all the resources, status updates, like profiles – all but ten per cent of that was non-existent just two years ago. It’s not possible for any of us to truly understand what that means for business, for our day-to-day lives, for everything as we know it, because we haven’t had enough time to process all that info and figure out how it all relates. Definitely, where the emphasis has been on big data in recent years, the latest push is on how we rationalise and contextualise all that info. Big data has become a buzzword, people have become more wary, because for all the insights and intelligence we have at our fingertips, no one’s really sure how to utilise it. This comes back, somewhat, to futurist Ray Kurweil’s ‘Law of Accelerating Returns’, which stipulates that more advanced societies and technology progress at a faster rate than previous ones – so we’re now progressing faster than any generation before us, and thus, we can’t rationalise and compute all these new inputs all at once because our brains are still adapting and working to get up to speed.

This is, in large part, why we’re often not able to see the possibilities of big data and all those advancing connections – that, and the context for them is often presented in such a way that it’s difficult for someone without an advanced qualification in psychology or analysis to fully grasp the significance of a concept like Facebook knowing you better than your wife. The consideration that I see is actually two-fold: the future and the present.

The Future 

As data advances, I see massive potential in all those reference points leading businesses and individuals to each other. In the case of the individual, let’s say that your Facebook profile – which we now know can be an accurate indicator of your personality – is only part of the overall puzzle.

Why Social Media is Good for Business3

Combining an individual’s activity on all three of these platforms would form an even clearer picture of who they are, not only in a personal sense, but professionally as well. When you consider that the next generation has grown up on social (remember, Facebook is now more than 10 years-old), and think about how much information each user has accumulated and logged online, you can imagine that if this data were combined, at scale, you would have a pretty accurate indicator of personality and career-oriented traits. This would enable you to make better decisions about employing people, build better understandings about the correlations between performance and personal traits, track the specific interests and personality types of the people who have purchased from you, enabling you to target future customers based on informed correlations.

At present, this data is not easily combined, as each platform keeps their own knowledge graph, but there are ways to extract such insights. There are methods you can use to build accurate personas – the next step is to build systems that track and expand your own data analysis in real-time. Imagine if you could build a system that logged the traits and behaviours of people who both Liked and went on to purchase from you, which updated in real-time. Imagine then that, armed with this knowledge, you could target your advertising or identify people to connect with based on those same traits, effectively highlighting your most relevant and responsive audience, based on data, and showing you new opportunities, every day. This is where the true power of social media data and data analysis lies – being able to locate and reach the right people, with the right content, at the right time – all the time. And with more and more data being entered, the reality of this scenario is becoming increasingly present. It pays to know what’s happening in this sector.

The Present

But again, that’s the future, that’s still some distance – and some cost – away from your day-to-day business, your real world grind. How does social media data deliver real, actionable, insights for you, right now? Really, with the amount of data we’re talking, how could it not?

For instance, let’s say members of your target audience – the people you need to get your brand name in front of – are active on social media. You can work out who, specifically, you need to be listening to, who your most likely prospects are, based on people who’ve previously purchased from you or people in positions that will make the call on whether or not to buy your stuff. You can analyse the presences of those target prospects and get an idea of what their questions are, what they’re discussing, what they’re most interested in. Let’s say you identify that a large portion of your audience is talking about a new TV show – you could use that in your own communications (contextually relevant, of course) and create content that’s more likely to resonate with the people you need to reach based on their specific interests.

Or you could work out who they listen to – word-of-mouth is the core thread of social selling. If you can work out that your target audience is listening to a specific influencer or influencers, you can examine their profiles, work out what they’re interested in, then reach out to them and connect to your target audience that way, by connecting through their established information sources and getting your name in front of them.

You can analyse your fans, followers, lurkers – there are any number of free or freemium social tools out there that enable you to extract specific insights and data about your social media audiences – both current and desired. And as the amount of interactions being undertaken online increases, so too do your chances of locating the information you need in your research. Right now, you can do this, right now, you can analyse the profiles of your business and your competitors and extract data insights and virtually no cost.

The Interaction Evolution

The Facebook Like study, to me, actually just reinforced or legitimised the power of social media data. Many people still see social as a fad, as nothing more than kids sharing pictures of themselves and/or their food. But if academia has found that those very actions can paint an extremely accurate picture of who a person is, you must also see that such data can form a map connecting your brand to your audience. Even if you’re not interested in social, if you’re not on the bandwagon, so to speak, have no interest in hashtags and LOLs and cute cats, you still have to recognise that social is the most powerful audience insights tool ever created. As Jay Z says:

If you can’t respect that, your whole perspective is whack”.

Maybe your audience isn’t on it – but are you sure? Maybe your customers don’t use it – but will they soon? The way people communicate has changed, the way we interact is evolving. Right now, you can livestream your life to the world, a level of connectivity that is unprecedented, would have been unfathomable just years ago. And that evolution is accelerating at a rate that we may not even be able to fully comprehend. What we do know is data. That which is happening is trackable, traceable, laid-out and accessible to anyone who cares to look. Used well, this can provide your business with a level of insight you’d never have even considered.

And that is good for business.

Will Meerkat Survive?

Meerkat

So Meerkating is now a thing. The immensely popular live-streaming app Meerkat has timed it’s rise to prominence in alignment with the annual South by Southwest Festival, leading to a perfect storm of Meerkats streaming from every talk, launch and dinner event. And it’s fun – it’s amazing to have such a level of access to the festival and it’s participants – the closest many of us, particularly those of us in other parts of the world, will ever get to actually being there and experiencing the event as it happens. I’ve loved jumping onto a Meerkat stream and getting Brian Fanzo’s perspective or Gary Vaynerchuck’s insight, all happening right there, as I watch. There’s a lot to like about Meerkat – but it’s time in the sun may be short-lived.

Up Periscope

In January, Twitter purchased Periscope, a video-streaming service that offers the exact same capabilities as Meerkat, and then some. Twitter’s been working with Periscope since November 2014, and was reportedly polishing the beta version when Meerkat – which was built in just 8 weeks – was released into the social sphere. Reports thus far have indicated that Periscope operates in much the same way as Meerkat – it will function as a separate app and enable Twitter users to create live streams, the links to which are tweeted out to your Twitter followers (or to selected users). Periscope will also give users the chance to view live streams or watch previously recorded ones, something not on offer via Meerkat. Another point of difference is that comments posted on Periscope won’t show up in your Twitter stream – not sure if this is a positive or negative at this stage. While it is odd seeing half messages or seemingly random interactions show up in your Twitter stream – which are actually responses to a Meerkat that user is watching – those conversation fragments can also spark interest in checking out the link yourself – time will tell if this has any effect on viewers.

Reports have suggested that Periscope is a far more polished and functional affair – which makes sense, given the short dev time for Meerkat – but has Periscope missed the boat and enabled Meerkat to establish a following?

Riding the Blue Bird

There is one other thing working against Meerkat – it’s been built on the back of Twitter’s network. As stated in the Meerkat documentation ‘everything that happens on Meerkat happens on Twitter’, and this could work against them as, effectively, a competing service. Already, Twitter’s moved to restrict Meerkat’s access to it’s social graph. While it’s unlikely Twitter would cut Meerkat off completely, building their network on Twitter’s land could prove problematic when Periscope does, eventually, get released – though some have also noted that this strategy may end up working in Meerkat’s favour.

The Race or the Service?

There was a question posted in a SXSW event over the weekend – an event I was watching via Meerkat – and it somewhat gets to the heart of the questions over the future of Meerkat and whether the app will exist long-term. The question, posed by Bryan Kramer, was:

My response to this is that the functionality of Meerkat is an extension of social connectivity – it brings everything another step closer. That’s really the ultimate goal of social media, to facilitate connections between people and groups and enable everyone to be part of the wider conversation. That’s the ethos that Mark Zuckerberg stands by, the mission to connect everyone and harness the power of collaboration to bring about real connection and, ideally, real change. In this vein, Meerkat is a perfect extension of such capacity – it’s the next step, allowing anyone to broadcast easily and in real-time to the rest of the world. And in that sense, the platform itself isn’t really the thing.

Whether it’s Periscope or Meerkat – or something else we haven’t even heard of, Meerkat’s live-streaming functionality is exciting and innovative – and it’s already got of the world’s best social media minds enamoured and thinking about how to utilise it in new ways. While I anticipate Periscope being being a great product, even if it does succeed Meerkat, time spent learning and seeing what you can do via Meerkat won’t be wasted. And maybe there’s room for both apps in the market – maybe some people will better align to the DIY-feel of Meerkat and refuse to use Periscope even if it is better. It’s likely that this window of opportunity Meerkat’s been afforded will enable it to establish a loyal audience of some kind – but regardless of how it pans out, the important element to note here is the functionality, the new capability and capacity being offered by live-streaming video. Network capacity of the past would’ve meant such innovation was simply impossible. But now, you might get the opportunity to experience celebrity events from the front row, live streamed by your favourite celebrity him or herself, access you’d never have dreamed of – and a powerful vehicle for engagement and building community.

Rather than worrying about who’ll win the race, take a moment to take in the spectacle of the event. It’s a fun ride that’s worth getting onto.

3 Ways to Use LinkedIn University Finder for Audience Research

LinkedIn-Logo-300x220

Have you heard of LinkedIn’s University Finder app? It’s something LinkedIn released last year that aims to help students determine which university they should attend in order to reach their career aspirations, based on the job they want, the subjects they’re studying, the companies they’d like to work for and where they want to live. The app does this by utilising LinkedIn’s masses of user data, highlighting where people who’ve studied at different institutions have gone on to find employment.

While that functionality in itself is pretty great, it’s also one of the best ways to access LinkedIn’s comprehensive data banks. You see, LinkedIn is pretty guarded with their API. This is understandable – many users don’t want their personal career info to be available to anyone and everyone – but anonymised data doesn’t subvert any privacy restrictions. And that data, being able to sort and sift LinkedIn’s info, can have significant value for more than just prospective university students – here’s a few ways you can use LinkedIn University Finder to better inform your own marketing and outreach efforts.

1. Where to Focus When Building Relationships with Future Decision-Makers

So, the filters of LinkedIn University Finder are:

LIUF

Based on the selection you make here, the top universities for your chosen career preferences are displayed below:

LIUF2jpg

Pretty simple, right? But access to all that data also means you can gain insights beyond academic recommendations. Let’s say, for example, you were in charge of an up-coming IT company and you wanted to boost your profile in order to attract the best candidates and enhance future business prospects. You could choose the specific area from the study field:

LIUF3

Then the specific location you’re interested in:

LIUF4

And the results will show the most popular universities for your chosen interest in your chosen region:

LIUF5

Now you know, based on actual employment histories, where the majority of students in your area of expertise are studying within this region. Using this, you can work with the relevant universities to establish connections with your business – develop sponsorship or graduate programs, arrange to do talks or work with students. All these efforts can help build connections with your business, boosting brand awareness and, ideally, making your company a desired employment option among top graduates. Even if winning over future employees isn’t your goal, by making connections with future business leaders at this stage, you’re helping establish connections for partnerships when those graduates progress to decision-making levels.

This is a long-term strategy which can help strengthen community and brand awareness and can help you gain an audience within the circles of your target customers, before they’ve reached that next stage.

2. What Skills to List on Your LinkedIn Profile

This is a quietly brilliant strategy, and one I can take absolutely no credit for it. In a recent post on Mashable, Joshua Waldman outlined how you can use LinkedIn University Finder to locate which skills you should list on your LinkedIn Profile to maximise your chances of gaining employment in your preferred industry and role. The strategy (which Joshua has detailed more comprehensively in his post) goes like this:

  1. Find the schools with the most graduates progressing to the roles and companies you want to work for
  2. Go to the LinkedIn Pages for those schools and filter their listings by the company and role
  3. This will then show you what skills those graduates have listed on their profiles, in order of frequency – these are the skills you want to be listing on your profile to increase your prospects (assuming you have the ability to back-up these skills, of course)

LIUF6

Waldman recommends doing this same research with several schools and job functions to get a more comprehensive idea of the skills those who are being employed in the roles you’re seeking are listing. Once you have a spreadsheet of all the listed skills, sort them by frequency of mentions, and you have a list of what you should be including on your profile to increase your chances of getting the role you want. Pretty clever, huh?

3. Where to Target Your Ads

This data also, inadvertently, gives you an insight into where you should consider targeting your advertising. For instance, if you were trying to reach marketing consultants in Melbourne, Australia, LinkedIn University finder tells me that the most likely places those people are employed are:

LIUF7

I could then use this info to target my ads on Facebook or Twitter, or I conduct research into whether I could advertise in their internal publications, find ways to reach them where they’re more likely to see it. Alternatively, it also highlights where prospects are not – if I do a search for people who’ve studied ‘Hair Styling/Stylist and Hair Design’ in the Melbourne area, I find that there’s really not many of them listed on LinkedIn. Not a big surprise really, but if I were considering advertising on LinkedIn and I knew the job titles of the people I was targeting, I could enter that into the filters and work out whether there’s a sizeable enough audience on the platform to focus on.

There are a range of other ways to utilise LinkedIn University Finder’s data – the amount of professional insights available via LinkedIn is unparalleled, and being able to filter the information in a quick and user-friendly way like this can be extremely valuable. If you haven’t used University Finder yet, I recommend you check it out.

How to Determine if Pages Have Purchased Followers or Likes

FakersOnline

Do you ever come across a business profile or page and think ‘what the…? How did they get 3,000 followers?’ As with most things in life, if something seems fishy, there’s a good likelihood that it probably is, and with the fake social media profile industry worth hundreds of millions of dollars per annum, it’s not hugely surprising to find out many individuals and brands have taken this route. Like, a heap of them have – just take a look at the results from the recent Instagram fake profile purge, where a whole range of celebrities took big hits in their follower counts.

And it makes sense, having more followers and likes can definitely improve your brand position – if you’re looking for a service online and find two similar providers, one with 38 likes and another with 3,000, the latter one’s gonna’ stand out – but with the practice of buying followers and likes so widespread, it’d be great to also have a way to work out who’s telling the truth, right? Here’s a couple of ways to work out if they’re telling you the fibs.

How to work out is someone’s Twitter followers are fake

Twitter is the open network, the one where people go to broadcast their thoughts and voice their opinions on the happenings of the world. As such, the biggest advantage of Twitter is that most of their data is publicly accessible, which makes it easier to work out what brands are doing, what strategies their employing – and also, whether they’re faking. It’s actually pretty easy to spot on Twitter, even without any significant investigation.

When looking through Twitter, it’s not uncommon for a celebrity to have a follower to following ratio that looks something like this:

fakers1

Gotye’s not a prolific tweeter, and as such, he’s not following a heap of people. But he’s Gotye, he’s a world-renowned musician, and his fans are keen to hear whatever it is he has to say – hence, despite him not following back many folk, he still has 414,000 followers. That makes sense for a public figure with a large fan base, but when you come across a non-public figure, someone you’ve never heard of, with a similar follower/following ratio, that’s a pretty clear indicator that something’s amiss.

There are a couple of options for testing this on Twitter – Status People’s ‘Fake Follower Check’ is one, Social Bakers, too, has a free fake followers test you can use – but my favourite is Twitter Audit, also free, very quick and very easy to use. The difference between each of these, and why I prefer TwitterAudit, is the number of records they check to get an indication of how many fake followers each profile has.

twitter auditors

Of course, the accuracy of each is relative to the amount of followers the subject has – the percentage of followers you’re testing decreases in-line with increases in follower count – but generally this data has been found to be indicative, when compared with tests on a more comprehensive scale.

To conduct a Twitter Audit, you just enter the handle you wanna’ check, sign-in with your Twitter credentials, and away you go. How the test works is, it takes a look at that random sample of up to 5,000 of the person’s followers and it looks at a range of factors for each – number of tweets sent, date of last tweet, follower/following ratio, etc. From this, the system determines which of those tested profiles are likely fake, then gives you a percentage and pie chart based on those findings:

Fakers2

There is, of course, a margin of error in this data, but it’s normally a fairly accurate indicator, particularly when analysing profiles with less than 5k followers.

To clarify and confirm the data further, you can conduct a manual check – paid tools like Followerwonk or Socialbro provide in-depth reports on follower growth over time. If you look up a profile and find a big drops or jumps in their follower numbers, like this:

Fakers3

Pretty safe to assume those followers didn’t all randomly switch off in the same week (unless, of course, there was an offending tweet or similar logical connection).

Using the available apps, it’s pretty easy to work out Twitter fakes. Twitter’s always working to eliminate illegitimate profiles, so we might one day see an Instagram style purge with a heap of celebrities taking hits. But till then, if you ever need confirmation, just run ‘em through a Twitter Audit, then sit back and scoff at their vanity.

How to work out is someone’s Facebook likes are fake

Facebook fakers are a little harder to pin down. Unlike Twitter, most of Facebook’s data is locked up or hidden behind privacy settings, making it a bit more difficult to determine, definitively, if someone’s cheating. There’s a few ways to go about it and while none of them will provide as clear a result as the Twitter audit options, they will give you some idea as to what’s going on with any given page.

Find out where their fans are from

So, let’s say that the Facebook page you’re looking at is a local business – they work within your local region, they not a subsidiary of a larger international corporation – the people they work with are, logically, going to be based in the local area. The people who sell Facebook likes tend to be from third world nations – as noted in this piece from Copyblogger. Most of the fake likes you’ll come across originate from Bangladesh, India, Egypt, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Syria and Indonesia. Now, that’s not to point the finger and say all of the ‘click farms’ in the world are based in these regions, but if our local business has a heap of likers from these nations, that’s a likely indication that their faking it. So how do work this out?

Facebook’s graph search enables you to search for a heap of different parameters. The one we can use in this case is:

Fakers4

You insert the name of the business page at the end and it’ll give you a display of all the hometowns of people who like that page. The problem with this is that Graph Search results are sorted based on affinity – how they’re connected to you – not by total number, so you can’t necessarily determine where the majority of this page’s likes come from, but if it’s a local business and they have a range of the above mentioned nations among the hometowns of their followers, you may have reason to question why they’re showing up there.

Extra note: In this piece by Miguel Bravo, Bravo also suggests that the results of Graph Search queries like:

‘Pages likes by people who like [insert page name]’

‘Countries of people who like [insert page name]’

‘Languages of people who like [insert page name]’

Can also produce telling results (and they definitely do in the example he’s provided).

Check their interaction versus their Likes

This is a more tenuous linkage, but it can provide some insight. So, if the page you’re looking at has 3,000 likes, you’d expect them to have a reasonable level of interaction on their posts, some discussion about their brand, right? You can do a quick assessment of their posts to see what sort of engagement they’re getting on each – fake profiles are not going to interact with posts, so if they’ve got a crazy amount of page likes but are getting no action on their updates, they may have bought likes. Or they’re not very good at understanding their audience.

By clicking on the actual ‘Like’ number on the page, you get a graph like this:

Fakers5

Now, dependent on other factors, this could be telling – a huge jump in likes on any given day indicates either a really popular post or promotion, or that the page has bought likes, you’ll only be able to determine this by cross-checking the data against the posts. The other metric to consider is ‘People Talking About This’ – so, in this case, I’d be a little suspect, given they have 3.7k total page likes, a big boost in likes in the last week, yet only one person ‘talking about this’. Again, these are not definitive measures – they can often end up being fuel for your own conspiracy theories, where you’re really seeing what you want to see. But having a look at the numbers can be revealing on a page that’s clearly purchased fake likes.

Extra tip: Fake profiles tend to have no profile image, or odd-looking, copied images – this is another element to check to further your investigation.

Really find out where their fans are from

If you’re really serious about finding Facebook fakers, paid app Fanpage Karma will give you a breakdown of the location of any page’s likers.

Fakers6

This is one of the clearest indicators you can use to determine if the page has purchased likes – if the top countries are nations where the brand doesn’t even operate, that’s a fairly large red flag waving in your face.

On one hand, it’s frustrating that there’s not an easier way to determine Facebook fakers, as there is with Twitter, but on the other hand, it doesn’t really matter either way – if they’ve purchased fake likes, there’s not a heap you can do. I mean, you could, theoretically, go through their list of fans and report each fake profile one-by-one (which you can also do on Twitter) but obviously, that’s pretty time consuming and with Facebook already dealing with thousands of reports per hour, it’s hard to know if those efforts will actually cause any effect – that, and the fact that some like sellers offer a ‘guarantee’, where they’ll replace removed spam accounts, lessens the potential impact of conducting your own faker crackdown. The ongoing updates to Facebook’s news feed algorithm mean that purchasing likes will hurt pages more than help in the end, and Facebook’s always working to eliminate fakes where they can. While a higher number of likes is better looking, as with most measurements in social, it’s only one part of the larger picture, one indicator of potential success. You might have ten total likes and that could be more effective than a thousand, if those ten fans are engaged, paying clients, responsive to your messaging.

Quality Vs Quantity

And this is the key element in the popularity contest – the metrics only tell a part of the story. While I can understand why businesses might consider boosting their numbers, metrics are only one element of the social marketing puzzle. What’s more, fake likes and followers hurt the core product of social platforms – there’s already been questions about Twitter’s actual user numbers with reports suggesting that 9% of profiles are fake. That sort of speculation hurts their brand sentiment and turns off potential investors – the fake profile industry is bad for social media business, and you best believe the platforms are doing all they can to identify and eradicate imposter accounts. As with Instagram, at any time you could see a similar cull on any platform – buying popularity could end up very embarrassing if you get caught out.

Any measurement is an indicator – Likes, followers, Klout, Kred – each, in itself, is something to consider, but the only way to confirm the true social credentials of a person or brand is to investigate them yourself. Look at their posts, their content, assess what they’re doing. There may be a logical reason why their numbers are the way they are. Or there may not. ‘Influence’ is relative – conducting your own analysis will show you whose earned it and whose bought something resembling what influence should be.